Author: NewsFeed

The Swedish electro act Daybehavior returns with a brand new track: ‘There’s Nothing Else’ – check it out!

The brilliant Stockholm based electropop act Daybehavior have released another track from their forthcoming new album “Based On A True Story”. “There’s Nothing Else” turns out to be a very luscious track in the good tradition of Daybehavior: an exquisite song structure, catchy hooks and a sweet vocal line by frontwoman Paulinda Crescentini. This is actually the second single from the upcoming album, as the 2015 track “Change” will also show up on the new album, albeit in a new dress. You can listen to the new single below. Daybehavior is a Swedish indie-pop trio, founded in Stockholm, in 1993 by Tommy Arell, Paulinda Crescentini and Carl Hammar. Their debut album “Adored” was released in 1996 by Swedish indie label North of No South Records (NONS). Per Gessle’s company JimmyFun Music, released the album in 15 countries worldwide. During 1998 and 1999 they,recorded their follow-up album with Kevin Petri, engineer on Massive Attack’s debut album “Blue Lines” (1991). NONS, dealing with financial problems, went into bankruptcy in 1999 and the album was locked from being released. By 2003, Crescentini and Hammar decided to finish the album, now updated with some new material. Their second album, “Have You Ever Touched a […]

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‘Click Interview’ with Icd-10: ‘Some Make Music To Open Hearts – We Aim To Perforate Other Organs’

ICD-10 is a medical classification for systematization of diagnoses. It means ‘International Classification of Diseases‘ and was created by the WHO (World Health Organization). Industrial- and a lot of electronic music very often focused on structure and deconstruction. This definition of pathology gives ICD-10 the conception they might be able to define a clear line between health and sickness without diffusion, although the border between physiology and pathology often isn’t quite that clear. Like the definitions between a so-called crystal clear tone or rhythm at one hand and site riot sounds at the other hand are not that accurate as they seem to be. A distortion makes sound sometimes more interesting than a clear phrase and the sickness in sounds helps them to find roughness, drive and groove. This is the way Daniel Himmelreich introduces ICD-10, which recently released their official debut album “Differential Diagnosis” on Hands. This work is a judicious mix between industrial-, techno- and trance music. I got more details about it all from Daniel Himmelreich. (Courtesy by Inferno Sound Diaries) Q: I noticed you are already active for several years now. Can you briefly summarize how you guys met and what have been the main facts […]

The post ‘Click Interview’ with Icd-10: ‘Some Make Music To Open Hearts – We Aim To Perforate Other Organs’ appeared first on Side-Line Music Magazine.

‘Click Interview’ with Icd-10: ‘Some Make Music To Open Hearts – We Aim To Perforate Other Organs’

ICD-10 is a medical classification for systematization of diagnoses. It means ‘International Classification of Diseases‘ and was created by the WHO (World Health Organization). Industrial- and a lot of electronic music very often focused on structure and deconstruction. This definition of pathology gives ICD-10 the conception they might be able to define a clear line between health and sickness without diffusion, although the border between physiology and pathology often isn’t quite that clear. Like the definitions between a so-called crystal clear tone or rhythm at one hand and site riot sounds at the other hand are not that accurate as they seem to be. A distortion makes sound sometimes more interesting than a clear phrase and the sickness in sounds helps them to find roughness, drive and groove. This is the way Daniel Himmelreich introduces ICD-10, which recently released their official debut album “Differential Diagnosis” on Hands. This work is a judicious mix between industrial-, techno- and trance music. I got more details about it all from Daniel Himmelreich. (Courtesy by Inferno Sound Diaries) Q: I noticed you are already active for several years now. Can you briefly summarize how you guys met and what have been the main facts […]

The post ‘Click Interview’ with Icd-10: ‘Some Make Music To Open Hearts – We Aim To Perforate Other Organs’ appeared first on Side-Line Music Magazine.

Depeche Mode and the railway arch

(By our UK correspondent Simon Helm) When Depeche Mode recorded Construction Time Again, they left the studio in order to find sounds for sampling. Armed with producer Gareth Jones’ Sony Professional Walkman, they roamed through East London construction sites in search of metal to strike. In the recent documentary, Hansa Studios: By the Wall 1976-90, Jones returns to the location the band used for a lot of their field recordings. In an archway leading from a dead-end street to a set of stairs, covered in graffiti, he rattles metal panels and explains the simple methods used to generate the sounds brought back to nearby Garden Studios. Daniel Miller’s Synclavier, which had been brought into the studio, had sampling capabilities, as did the band’s E-MU Emulator I. The band had the tools to play with found sounds, and they took inspiration from an Einsteurzende Neubauten concert to combine industrial noise with pop. This approach also added some grit to their sound: as Martin Gore explains in the Hansa Studios documentary, their field trips sometimes attracted the attention of workers or watchmen, one of whose “Oi!” cries became part of their set. The Pedley Street Arch, as the location is known, currently […]

The post Depeche Mode and the railway arch appeared first on Side-Line Music Magazine.

Depeche Mode and the railway arch

(By our UK correspondent Simon Helm) When Depeche Mode recorded Construction Time Again, they left the studio in order to find sounds for sampling. Armed with producer Gareth Jones’ Sony Professional Walkman, they roamed through East London construction sites in search of metal to strike. In the recent documentary, Hansa Studios: By the Wall 1976-90, Jones returns to the location the band used for a lot of their field recordings. In an archway leading from a dead-end street to a set of stairs, covered in graffiti, he rattles metal panels and explains the simple methods used to generate the sounds brought back to nearby Garden Studios. Daniel Miller’s Synclavier, which had been brought into the studio, had sampling capabilities, as did the band’s E-MU Emulator I. The band had the tools to play with found sounds, and they took inspiration from an Einsteurzende Neubauten concert to combine industrial noise with pop. This approach also added some grit to their sound: as Martin Gore explains in the Hansa Studios documentary, their field trips sometimes attracted the attention of workers or watchmen, one of whose “Oi!” cries became part of their set. The Pedley Street Arch, as the location is known, currently […]

The post Depeche Mode and the railway arch appeared first on Side-Line Music Magazine.

KMFDM – Paradise

With 2019 marking 35 years of conceptual continuity, KMFDM is showing no signs of slowing down or mellowing out – on the contrary, the Ultra Heavy Beat is as fired up and as energized as ever with the release of the band’s 21st album,…

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